Businessman TOday
The dna of assistance The dna of assistance
New research in the fields of genetics, molecular biology and neurology indicate, that many of our primary personality traits are decided at birth and... The dna of assistance

New research in the fields of genetics, molecular biology and neurology indicate, that many of our primary personality traits are decided at birth and are a result of our genetics. This means, that a person has no impact on their personality. Easily said – helping others is in our genes. Or not…

Personality determines not only our inner selves, but our behavior as well. It influences among other things on how much some individual eats, drinks, if they smoke and if so how much, if they cheat, steal, goes skydiving or is terrified by the very thought of such an action, if they prefer the atmosphere of a loud nightclub or the quiet of a library, how much they talk and how much they like to sleep. It is personality which determines the level of commitment an individual has toward their professional endeavors, dependence on rewards for motivation, will to work with others or vice versa – alone behind their separated desk. The specific personality factors determine the choice of a profession, as well as seeking stimulation in a variety of environments, both social and professional.

Dependent on the individual’s personality is: if the person is extroverted or introverted, active, or passive, what kind of people they are attracted to and how they will behave if the individual accepts them. Personality also influences on the level of stress some individual deals with, physical health, whether their life is full of misery which they actively seek out or pleasure for which they are even willing to take risks; as well as determining if life is a lazy stroll or a high-octane ride. After all it is due to personality whether an individual is patient or not, more or less systematic, detailed, level headed or explosive, fast, loud and committed to issues of high importance and charity events. It clearly shows how active we are in charities and humanitarian efforts. New research in the fields of genetics, molecular biology and neurology indicate, that many of our primary personality traits are decided at birth and are a result of our genetics. This means, that a person has no impact on their personality. Easily said – helping others is in our genes. Or not…

Readiness to help, the willingness of an individual to encourage others, to share their skills and their level of concern for others; this is one aspect of the trait of cooperation.

With our commitment to the trails of other people an individual shows how important others are for them; showing them kindness, friendship, and love. Even though most things can be accomplished by an individual on their own, most often we are among other people, who directly or indirectly influence how we accomplish our goals. Not necessarily on purpose, but people from an individual’s surroundings, either help or hinder an individual’s efforts via their own actions. Personal preferences and private values affect how a person evaluates the presence of others and their participation in their activities, but the ability to work together is often vital to the completion of the task. Cooperation relates to the ability to adapt to others, finding common priorities and the flexibility to work together. Both in private life and in the professional setting, having the quality of “cooperation” allows for the client and harmonious functioning within a community, and in many cases, increases the effectiveness of work being done. Readiness to help, the willingness of an individual to encourage others, to share their skills and their level of concern for others; this is one aspect of the trait of cooperation. It is this aspect which is seen in action when we go to help another person. It is this trait that determines if we can have empathy for others and react to their needs. Often a kind of compulsion even accompanies this – we feel bad if someone else is feeling bad, and we are willing to continue our efforts in that individual’s name so long as it takes for us to reach serenity, which comes with the moment in which we are sure we did everything we could or the individual no longer needs our help. Some people have this trait developed to an above-average level, and therefore are the backbone of institutions and aid organizations. It is them that volunteers and people of good will gather about. Luckily there is quite a lot of such people, and since it is a genetic trait we should hope that such people will continue to be born and that nobody will ever end up without help or support. This I wish for myself, and for you… ■

Joanna Kolenda

No comments so far.

Be first to leave comment below.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *